©2017 Curlock and Jalaiso Music, BMI

Where the Winter Ends

Finally free of the rattle in my chest
stealing the oxygen I had to strain to collect
finally free of the rattle in my chest
it's like an obligation, lifted

Finally free of the rattle in my mind
bleeding the self-belief from every verse that i rhyme
finally free of the rattle in my mind
suddenly gravity has shifted

Plant my foot in the dirt
and race to the Sound
give my will to the path
wherever long it's bound
all my doubts they blur and fade
like yesterday's skywriting
I'm caught up in the wake
of a moment that's flying

Here's where the fever breaks
the still after the shakes
a new morning remakes me

Here's where the winter ends
"become" blooming from "pretend"
"because" cannot contain me

What If

What if we didn’t punish ourselves for what we’re not
stopped wishing for some other heaven than the one we’ve got?
What if you didn’t try to impress someone lost in your past
and let the long dialogue with your regrets fall silent at last?


What if we weren’t looking through
a haze of memories and dreams that won’t come true
if I was blind to the expectations
what would I see, and what would you?


Light from the ground throws our shadows on the blue
turn the world upside down and I remember how to love you


What if we were an arrow that landed wide of the mark
how long would that first good intention define who we are?

What if I were to tell you that miss was as close as we’ll get
how long would the song in your heart remain a secret kept?


This Room

This room was made to make you
look and feel your worst
motel mirror, bare fluorescents
it’s not a room for charitable guesses
about the suitcase they dragged outside
to the cruiser with the flashing lights
that pulled away past the liquor store and into the night


This room was made to make you
second-guess your direction, hesitate,
and call into question the reservation
that yielded a quarter-hearted smile and a key
and a map photocopied into un-readability


This room sees a vacancy
when it tries to read your eyes
but that’s just the dark of a moonless night
on a long stretch of highway miles


This room was made to make you
wonder if you’re worth less than you hoped
hard water, lousy soap, barely furnished, barely clean,
just a rude regression to a meaner mean


More

The evening’s filled to overflowing with rose-colored light
as if the dreamer who imagines us is almost awake
we’re combing through confetti, trying to make sense of life
hoping the words we piece together are not a mistake


Looking for faces in pictures of Mars
for a moment’s quite grace in a noisy bar
we heard half of a rhyme
and there has to be more


Driving home together through the Long Island night
I’m trying to read the silence and the smiles you discard
was it fate that led me to you, on a course marked in parallels and primes
or the lazy afterimage of some haphazard star


Tell me there’s been a signal buried in the static all this time
tell me the answer’s hiding in plain sight and we’ve been snow blind
tell me I’ll wake up beside you every morning for a long, long, long time
tell me we’re half of a story, half of a rhyme,
and there has to be more


You've Lost Your Way

Sounds like the final repercussions
of a dead beat dragged out way too long
the landlord isn’t singing any praises
to the sheriff standing on the lawn
you don’t say a word
piling the guts of your life
like so much garbage at the curb
can’t meet the going rate
can’t speak the shibboleth
so they drive you from the gate
and they tell you
you’ve lost your way


Four years old
with a smile that radiated
with the undiluted joy of all creation
she waved at me from the park one fine morning
and I gladly returned her salutation
but the next passerby told the child
“if you can’t speak the language
go back to where you came from”
Now who’s lost their way?


You Are My Raincloud

You are my raincloud, my only raincloud
you bring me shade and shadow on a bright summer day
when the sun fumes across the pale, bruised heavens
in a conflagration of anger
the laughter of your cool rain
is the answer to my only prayer


Don’t take it away
don’t take it away
don’t take away your love


You are my darkness, my only darkness
and a respite for my eyes when the argent winter stabs at my sight
and the snow, like an arrogant lie
obscures the earth ‘neath a insult of whiteness
you bring down the black, blessed night
and a vision of spring’s colorful dream


Five Feet to the Meter

Five feet to the meter boys
time and space have grown elastic
we’ve sailed beyond the edge of consciousness
and I’m dreaming in iambic


I find it takes a pretty cooked shuffle to deal in absolutes
so I encourage you not to take what’s said between us
as proof of any universal truth
go ahead, if it comforts you to feel that cosmic forces
are operating in cahoots
but as for me, despite the words on my degree,
philosophy has never been my strongest suit


To some, these songs they fall in heavy clusters
fat grapes already sweetened by the dozen on the vine
others spend forever polishing that perfect apple
looking for a slightly sweeter rhyme
me, I change the oil, fill the tank, and re-inflate that right front tire
try to keep the old jalopy moving down the road
for another couple hundred thousand miles


Set off on my morning run
moving down the street, fast and steady
passed a woman who I’d never met
she started, and said, “is it eight o’clock already?”
how many secret other lives we each must lead, never knowing
how many times I’ve hitched a ride inside a song
and never thought to ask where it was going


Cool Night, Quiet Place

Heat from the fire on my hands and face
I’m grateful for a cool night in a quiet place
a cool night in a quiet place

I’m lost in cereal-box psychiatry self-diagnosis
after all these years I still don’t know if it’s you or me
that’s making me so crazy


You came hardwired with that post-war frugality
guarding cracked and yellowed dishes like your own mortality
you keep everything: scraps of paper, bits of string,
and a head full of sordid grievances from a past life
like an expired inventory that you can’t move at any price
couldn’t give away to save your life


You would have us drain the ocean
revive each drowned emotion from the deep
each wreck on every reef
I would rather cut the anchor
let it sink with all our anger down through the blue
and sail on with you
without the past always in view


Like two weary ships come through a bitter storm
our hulls are leaking and our sails are badly worn
and the who and why doesn’t matter to me any more
we’ll find no sweet resolution rising from the sea
by charting powder burns of blame back through the family tree
what’s needed now are gentle winds and calmer seas

 

track listing:

 

where the winter ends
what if
this room
strange sat(i)ellite
more
you've lost your way
you are my raincloud
into a corner
five feet to the meter
cool night, quiet place

 

Released 2017. ℗ 2017 Curlock & Jalaiso Music, BMI. © 2017 Curlock & Jalaiso Music, BMI. All songs written by Jean-Paul Vest except “You Are My Raincloud” by Jean-Paul Vest and Shawn Murray. Produced and Recorded by Jean-Paul Vest and Jim Watts. Additional Recording by: Pemberton Roach, Bob Stander, Steve Schiltz, Tom Griffith, Matt Darriau, Fernando Sanchez, Pam Aronoff, and Jonny Flaugher. Mixed by Jim Watts at moxymusic. Mastered by Gene Paul at G&J Audio. Musicians: Jean-Paul Vest, Shawn Murray, Pemberton Roach, Bob Stander, Jim Watts, Pam Aronoff, Gwendolyn Vest, Nicholas Vest, Camryn Quinlan, Scott Doherty, Aaron Palmadessa, Fernando Sanchez, Martha Trachtenberg, Tom Griffith, Jon Preddice, Matt Darriau, Jonny Flaugher, Michael Jerome, Steve Schiltz. Cover art by Tony Ingrisano

 

 

 

 

"It's a rare and wondrous moment…" The Daily Vault, Jason Warburg

It’s a rare and wondrous moment when a song reaches so deep inside and resonates so strongly that it sends waves of tingling “chicken skin” dancing back and forth from my shoulder blades to the top of my scalp. This happened not once, but twice over the course of my first couple of listens to the new album from Last Charge Of The Light Horse, the vehicle for the songs, voice and guitar of Jean-Paul Vest.

Race To The Sound is Vest’s fourth album (plus an EP) under the Last Charge moniker, and first since 2014’s superb Nine Kinds Of Happy. He remains one of the most prodigiously talented singer-songwriters I have ever encountered, a poet who sets his striking words to imaginative roots-rock that is all substance and no flash. Vest’s songs stun you with subtlety and wow you with precision; every instrument, note, and voice is placed with forethought and purpose.

CD Baby recommends Last Charge if you like Wilco, XTC and Bob Dylan, three artists I’ve rarely seen grouped together, and yet I have to tip my hat to the algorithm, even if the list feels incomplete without Vest’s acknowledged idol George Harrison. His songs are all at once lyrical and unassuming, shimmery and earthy, bracingly direct and fearlessly experimental.

Ever the insightful observer, Vest opens the new album with a song about songwriting, employing the flu as a metaphor for creative drought. “Finally free of the rattle in my chest / stealing the oxygen I had to strain to collect… Finally free of the rattle in my mind / bleeding the self-belief from the every verse that I rhyme.” Musically, “Where The Winter Ends” is pure imagination, opening over electronic percussion, adding strummed electric guitar, sharp interjections of flute and trumpet (from the next generation of talent, Nicholas and Gwendolyn Vest), shakers and tambourine, and gorgeous, gospel-tinged harmony vocals by Camryn Quinlan. Every note and vocal inflection is exactly where it should be; the way Vest sings just two words—“obligation lifted”—tells an entire story in six spare syllables. Toward the end, the song coalesces around a deft, powerful description of the experience of creation: “All my doubts they blur and fade / like yesterday’s skywriting / I’m caught up in the wake / of a moment that’s flying.”

And then there are nine more.

“What If,” which Vest previewed on social media last year, is a stunner, a rumination on possibility and fate set to gorgeous chiming guitars, with the ace Last Charge rhythm section of Shawn Murray (drums) and Pemberton Roach (bass) setting the pace as the song gains momentum, adding strings, electronic percussion and harmony vocals. “Light from the ground throws our shadows on the blue,” he sings as the music surges, “turns the world upside down and I remember how to love you.” Chicken skin, every time. At 2:30 Vest adds little slide guitar filigrees right out of the Harrison toolkit, played by guest Aaron Palmadessa, launching an already spectacular number into the stratosphere. Which is what Vest does, again and again: he takes subject matter that can feel deceptively simple and elevates it with his craftsmanship and imagination. And really, what is simple about the human heart?

Next is a song about a motel room, which sounds mundane, but in Vest’s hands becomes a musical rendering of a Hopper painting, “Nighthawks” relocated to a Super 8 where the occupants of one room are being dragged out to a waiting police cruiser while the traveler next door is rethinking his entire life. “This room was made to make you / second-guess your direction, hesitate / and call into question the reservation that yielded a quarter-hearted smile and a key / and a map photocopied into unreadability.” You can feel the ennui of the night clerk and smell the must in the curtains, and then a chorus of harmony vocalists enters (Martha Trachtenburg, Tom Griffith, and Pam Aronoff) to play off of Vest’s lead vocal and the skittering, steady-on Roach-Murray rhythm section and you’re lost inside a haunting, Springsteenesque film.
Two instrumental tracks function as musical aperitifs between courses of songs here, the first being “Strange Sat(i)ellite,” an eerie, jazzy duet between Vest’s piano and son Nicholas’s trumpet, until Jonathan Preddice’s cello and Murray’s drums enter and it gets even more unsettled, and unsettling.

Next up after that entertaining interlude is “More,” all shimmery, rippling 12-string guitar notes at first until Vest’s voice enters in his lower register, anchoring a stunning love song. When the drums and Pam Aronoff’s gorgeous harmony vocals arrive, the songs begins a steady, inexorable build to an eruptive solo from Bob Stander, lead guitarist in Last Charge’s core lineup. And that’s just the music; the lyric is equally powerful and sublime, juxtaposing the biggest questions life has to offer (“Tell me there’s been a signal buried in the static all this time”) alongside the simplest, most fundamental human desires (“Tell me I’ll wake up beside you every morning for a long, long time”)

The mood shifts again with “You’ve Lost Your Way,” a spare, haunting number featuring just Vest’s guitar, spooky electronic percussion, and Murray’s stuttering, unruly drums. The lack of bass amplifies the sense of dislocation in the lyric, leaving you to ponder whether the title refrain refers to homeless people, immigrants, or the nation itself. The answer, it seems, is yes.

“You Are My Raincloud” inverts the standard imagery of love as bright sunshine, a song that starts out lilting and steadily unravels as Vest sings of craving the darkness and tension in a challenging relationship. Roach’s athletic bass line is a highlight here, as is Stander’s nervous-breakdown solo, while the lyric offers some of Vest’s bleakest and most penetrating poetry: “You are my darkness, my only darkness / and a respite for my eyes when the argent winter stabs at my sight.”

Instrumental interlude number two is really just a vignette, Vest tinkering with a synthesizer and drum machine for a bare 1:22, but entertaining at that. Next on the menu, “Five Feet to the Meter” is another song about songwriting and the lived experience of a creator. “We’ve sailed beyond the edge of consciousness / and I’m dreaming in iambic,” he sings, an apt description of the unencumbered creative imagination. Mid-song Vest adds clarinet, a rather ordinary instrument that feels absolutely exotic in this context.

Moody closer “Cool Night, Quiet Place” rides a steady, pulsing guitar riff which repeats and repeats, pushing the poetry forward as Vest entreats a family member to let go of old grudges. “You keep everything: scraps of paper, bits of string / and a headful of sordid grievances from a past life / like an expired inventory you can’t move at any price / couldn’t give away to save your life.” It’s another instantly recognizable character, sketched in a handful of lines.

Overall, Race To The Sound feels like a milestone of sorts, marking the seamless incorporation of the electronic elements that dominated 2011’s Curve EP and decorated 2014’s Nine Kinds Of Happy into Vest’s core sound of rangy, thoughtful roots-rock. Much like his lyrics, which repeatedly subvert both clichés and expectations, the music that accompanies them is full of tension and quirks right up until, when it needs to, it rocks. Vest and co-producer/multi-instrumentalist Jim Watts make all the pieces fit together with crisp yet organic-feeling production.

For a summation I’ll turn to Vest’s Last Charge bandmate Pemberton Roach, who recently described his friend’s work like this: “super-intense, exquisitely crafted, deeply thoughtful, and just plain beautiful music… I know more than a few people who consider him to be a genius. I'm not exaggerating when I say I consider him one of the all-time great ‘unknown’ American artists and believe his name should be mentioned in the same breath as legendary purveyors of ‘thinking man’s’ music like Richard Thompson, Leonard Cohen, and Lloyd Cole… If you’re in the mood for music that rewards repeated listenings and favors art over commerce, I highly recommend this album.”

Amen.

Rating: A

 

"I can’t imagine a better album released this year, or for quite some time."Tuned Loud!

To cut to the chase, the album “Race to the Sound” by Last Charge of the Light Horse, completely blew me away! The entire recording is filled with stellar compositions across the board. Just about every minute is filled with nothing short of awesome music. There is so much going on, and I imagine the content inside this release can appeal to a wider audience – even to those unfamiliar with this project’s previous efforts. Right from the beginning, you truly notice how carefully constructed each composition is. Everything is meticulously written and masterfully performed. The musicianship and engineering are unbelievably great. So much loving care and intricate work went into every track, and it clearly shows.

Last Charge of the Light Horse was formed in 2004 as a vehicle for songwriter Jean-Paul Vest’s creativity. Vest has released three albums and an EP, gaining mention in several “Best of the Year” lists and heavy rotation on college radio, charting as high as #1 on stations around the country. Much like the music, the lineup of supporting musicians has evolved over the years. Originally a trio, the lineup has expanded to a quartet, with Vest currently joined by drummer Shawn Murray, lead guitarist Bob Stander, and bassist Pemberton Roach.

“Race to the Sound” is a rare lesson in how a talented musician can metamorphose, mature, and really surpass anything they’ve done before. Each successive album in this development has felt like a clear improvement over the last despite there being the strangest sensation that there was still some room for improvement.

This isn’t the case here. The words, the musicianship and harmonies, everything here comes together in a way that is so much more realized than in previous albums. From the sleeve artwork to the instrumentation, it all feels thematically consistent; like one elaborate idea and concept.

Jean-Paul Vest is gifted in taking a melody and developing it throughout a song – first it may appear as a very sparse single line from a single instrument alongside the lead vocal, then the orchestration of that main theme builds as it is repeated throughout the song.

Compound that by 3-5 solid, unique little melody lines per song that all are individually developed, then intertwine and complement each other and you have a real work of high art. That formula is repeated endlessly and to great effect right from track one “Where The Winter Ends”.

The lead guitar solos are complex, technically demanding, and yet relaxed at the same time, never descending into noodling – as can be heard on the stunning “More”. This is an album that sounds great the first time you hear it and gets better and richer with every listen.

Especially when you meet up with a song like “Strange Sat(i)ellite”, which to all intents and purposes could sit comfortably inside a jazz-fusion collection by Weather Report, as it could on any Baroque rock album. It is a roller coaster of styles and emotions, just the way great progressive music should be.

Jean-Paul Vest is clearly one of the most talented people working in music today. Listening to the album, I kept expecting him to stumble, to grind out something passively, recycling ideas without putting much thought or energy into it. But no, he just kept coming up with one outstanding effort after another.

From the intensely emotional “You’ve Lost Your Way”, to the concise instrumental “Into The Corner”. Then onto the poetic “Five Feet To The Meter”, to the intoxicating “Cool Night, Quiet Place”. The lyrics, music and musicianship make these all keepers. A musical journey that takes the listener on an emotional ride – light and dark, fast and slow, dreamy and jamming, this album has it all.

Unlike so many musicians of similar artistic expression, Jean-Paul Vest, and his Last Charge of the Light Horse create a work that is so approachable and easy to listen despite to its actual underlying depth and complexity. This is likely in no small part also due to the masterful arranging, engineering and production, but it’s so much more than that.

It’s a composition of many elements that in execution, form a seamless, nearly flawless product. If you care about good music, pay attention to this album. I can’t imagine a better album released this year, or for quite some time.

 

"Vest’s songs are lyrical, unpretentious, thoughtful, glittering, and earthy. One cannot assume what comes in the next line; all the songs come within the shell of a direct and dynamic experiment."Skope, Neil Jhonson

The alternative indie rock band, the Last Charge of the Light Horse, has recently launched their new album ‘Race to the Sound’ on an obvious versatile platter. Since 2004, Jean-Paul Vest and his crew have been continuing their musical journey, surprising the audience with Vest’s unique and rare sound, and successful experiments on different kinds of musical recipes. Many songs are out there that touch the strings of the heart of listeners, but the specialty of ‘Race to the Sound’ lies at a bit further level. Nearly all the soundtracks of this album are so rich in rhythm, sound, and beats that it draws all the strings of your heart so that it will cherish on the tingling joy of the songs forever.
Through ”Race to the Sound,” Last Charge of the Light Horse have tried to tell the audience about their potential for sound creation. In the album, Vest’s songs are lyrical, unpretentious, thoughtful, glittering, and earthy. One cannot assume what comes in the next line; all the songs come within the shell of a direct and dynamical experiment. The wondrous sound creates an aura that will never become dull and monotonous; the ears of the listener will want to stick to the dynamic music again and again.
Like a true insightful watcher, Vest opens ‘Race to the Sound’, with a song about the capability of songwriting. In the opening song, the writer has used the flue as a metaphor for the creative and imaginative drought. In terms of music, “Where the Winter Ends” is a song of pure and organic imagination, that gets support and comfort from electronic percussion, the right proportioned screaming of electric guitar, injections of flute and trumpet, and gorgeous vocals by Camryn Quinlan.
Every note and vocal emphasis have been put exactly where they meant to be; there is no exaggeration or extra stress Vest has shown, not in a single line of any song of the whole album. The way Vest is singing out just two words, ”obligation lifted”, is mesmerizing; only an imaginative and experiment prone mind can sound like that. It seems like he has explained the whole story by pronouncing just these two words.
And then comes ”What If’’ that has already become a stunner and showstopper of ‘Race to the Sound’. The electrifying waves of guitar, the drumming, and such other instrumentation has made ”What If” a heart-locking song, a true gift to the mind and soul. The melancholy tone, paired with the dynamic experiments of music and sound of this song echoes the true, original, and authentic sound of the Last Charge of the Light Horse.
“This Room” giving a description of a motel room. But with the imaginative and creative touch of Vest, the motel room overcomes its mundane simplicity, and get painted with ear-soothing melody, transforming into a musically furnished room.
There are many other fabulous songs Vest has put in ‘Race to the Sound’. Overall, the album seems like a musical and melodious milestone of the Last Charge of the Light Horse. Once you listen to it, it will become harder to get an escape from its magnetic attraction.

 

"…highly impactful music by top class musicians with a seemingly natural ability to craft songs that grab your attention, keep you engaged, and leave you on the edge of your seat wondering what’s about to happen next."midtnmusic.com, Joshua Smotherman

Formed in 2004, Last Charge of the Light Horse became a channel for New York based songwriter Jean-Paul Vest to sonically explore the ups and downs of everyday life. Now with four albums, one EP, spots on multiple “best of” lists and heavy rotation on college radio (including #1 peaks on various charts) under their belts, Last Charge of the Light Horse return with their newest album Race To The Sound.
Race To The Sound is very distinct. I am unable to classify this under any one genre, but trust me when I say this highly impactful music by top class musicians with a seemingly natural ability to craft songs that grab your attention, keep you engaged, and leave you on the edge of your seat wondering what’s about to happen next.
Clocking in at 10 songs and 43 minutes of sonic delight, Last Charge of the Light Horse takes us on an aural journey through infectious melodies, well thought out instrumentation, experimental arrangements including a healthy infusion of jazz elements, and some really sweet sounding guitar work which keeps us anchored in the rock genre while the band bends, stretches and molds frequencies into a barrage of unpredictable yet very stimulating sounds.
I am unable to choose a favorite song as each one contains something special that will pique your attention. Upon repeat listens, you will find yourself noticing things you did not notice the first listen through. This gives the album more life and much more potency.
Race To The Sound is now available.

 

"Vest writes songs that aren't predictable. They're smart and ultimately well-crafted and feature wonderful winding melodies and lyrics that are a far cry from the average twenty-first century shallow dribble. And the guy's voice is just...fantastic." Babysue

See link for full review.

"Sung straight from the heart everything works together to craft a vast tapestry of sound…done with a tremendous amount of vigor and beauty."Beach Sloth

Last Charge Of The Light Horse’s “Race To The Sound” represents a perfected form of indie pop. Done with the utmost of care, the thoughtfulness of the album is incredibly. The album feels akin to going on a journey of self-discovery, for the introspective odes are packed with honest emotion and clever insight. Sung straight from the heart everything works together to craft a vast tapestry of sound. Every song adds just a little bit more to the overall scope of it all, done with a tremendous amount of vigor and beauty. Instrumentally, they embrace a wide variety of style, going from a nimble post-rock quality to modern folk to chamber pop all while possessing their own unique style.

A hushed awe introduces the album with the spacious “Where The Winter Ends”. By far the highlight comes with the impeccable twists and turns of “What If”. The bluesy aura of “This Room” incorporates group play with such ease, letting the song unfurl with an uncanny sense of grace. Layer upon layer of dreamy sound comes together on the brilliant hues of “More”. Highly creative with its tension-filled rhythms is the loose and uneasy approach of “You Are My Raincloud”. Stripping things down to the essentials the honest “Five Feet To The Meter” goes for an intimacy. Perfectly bringing it to a close is the soothing “Cool Night, Quiet Place”.

“Race To The Sound” shows off Last Charge Of The Light Horse’s impressive chops, delving into a joyous world, one full of hope

 

"[What If] beats the singer-songwriter at their own game and weaves musical motifs and instrumental intricacy through the songs heart in a way that only a full, but well edited and understated, band can." Dancing About Architecture, Dave Franklin

Not only a brilliant name for a band, I’m a sucker for the weird and historical so this one really works for me, but a great song too. What If runs along gentle indie-rock lines but so skilfully that it never falls into the usual traps that either genre has to offer. It blends jazzy offbeat quirk with smooth and soulful undercurrents. It beats the singer-songwriter at their own game and weaves musical motifs and instrumental intricacy through the songs heart in a way that only a full, but well edited and understated, band can.

Now I would probably be remiss in my duties as a journalist if I didn’t try to sound clever and more knowledgable than everyone else, so at this point I will offer The Liberty Horses as a comparison, a little known band which acted as a musical vehicle for the MacColl brothers in the 90’s. Last Charge of The Light Horse play with the same pristine pop, same folky vibes and the same deft songwriting. It works for me.

 

"a great example of the harmony that many years of experience can fold together" TheMusic.Reviews

Recently released by Last Charge of the Light Horse, their new and well executed single “What if” is a great example of the harmony that many years of experience can fold together, not just musically, the harmony of it all, the lyrics, the musical craftsmanship, the sound production, all spot on!

 

"From the second you push play, you hit the ground running. I love it." Act/One Magazine

I love beginnings that just jump right into it. It’s not that often that you hear that these days so when I first pushed play on this track, you can imagine my surprise!? From the second you push play, you hit the ground running. I love it.

There is a kind of sweet and comfortable atmosphere to this track. The production has elements from both British pop and American indie, and it’s a perfect blend. “What If” is the second track on the album “Race to the sound” and it’s a perfect number two track.

The vocals on this track are great. The harmonies are even better! I love the way the voices are produced and placed in the song, and I love the general sound of the frontman’s voice.

All in all this is a great track and something you definitely should check out. I had the chance to check out the whole album, and I hope you do the same. It’s a great piece of work and something worth listening to. For me, it’s the perfect Sunday-album.

 

"a rich sound that lingers in the mind" Beach Sloth

Last Charge of the Light Horse go for a thoughtful indie rock sound on the all-encompassing style of “What If”. With nods to chamber pop, classical, and early 90s alternative rock, there is something deeply comforting about the piece. Guitars ring out for the group goes for a spacious light-soaked sound. Best of all are the reassuring vocals that guide the track forward. The lyrics further emphasize this gentle spirit, a mixture of narration, poetry, truly optimism to its very core. Color reigns supreme over the course of the track for everything simply swings about in a most joyous way.

The opening sets the tone for the piece. Mysterious guitars weave themselves into the overall mix. Vocals offer an anchor of sorts while beats have a delicate touch. Upon truly coming into bloom the guitars become more straightforward, while elements of strings further come into the mix adding to the aural richness of it all. Last Charge of the Light Horse focuses upon good intentions, upon the decisions that make up an entire life. About halfway through the piece they let loose a little bit, incorporating additional elements of funk and various studio effects. With this joyous attention everything comes together in a beautiful stream of sound. Perfect in temperament it all works, as Last Charge of the Light Horse feels so deeply happy especially towards its emotionally-charge finale.

“What If” explores thoughts of Last Charge of the Light Horse’s enlightenment with a rich sound that lingers in the mind.

 

"'What If' is a great track from a beautiful album" mi2n

Last Charge of the Light Horse, a band best known for their versatile music, is out with a new album, Race to the Sound. It features the track, "What If," which is a gorgeous song. The band started off in 2004, meant to be for singer Jean-Paul Vest's unique sound. It currently consists of Vest, Shawn Murray (drums), Bob Stander (lead guitar), and Pemberton Roach (bass). They have an interesting sound that never grows dull, as they're always experimenting to create new and dynamic music.

The song starts off, with Vest singing almost immediately- while I love well-established intros, as a person who is easily enamoured with lyrics, this is something I tend to prefer. Vestís voice is soft and easy to listen to. It has character and a lot of heart. The quality reminded me a little bit of the Pet Shop Boyís Neil Tennant (missing, obviously, is the accent you can hear clearly in Tennantís voice). All in all, the vocals on this track give one a calming feeling that meshes well with the music itself.

The drum work is the biggest star of this song, I believe. Murray did a wonderful job. They not only set the base for "What If," but they take center stage with a great rhythm and masterful talent. The guitar also gently carries you through the melody beautifully and the bass compliments it well. My favorite part is around the middle of the song, when you can very clearly hear the bass. It adds a cool element and another layer that works really well- I wish it was clear for a little longer throughout "What If," but then it wouldn't feel as special. Every part of the song blends beautifully into a track that you'll want to come back to and experience again.

The song opens immediately with, "What if we didnít punish ourselves for what we're not? / Stopped wishing for some other heaven, than the one we've got. / What if you didn't try to impress someone lost in your past?" It struck a chord with me and demanded that i pay attention to the rest of the song. Sadly, there isn't another part that really stuck with me. I almost wish those lyrics were able to be somewhere else in the song. Starting strong is a great thing, but only if the lyrics can keep the consistency. With that said, it's still solid and leaves you thinking about the past that youíre still holding onto and if itís time to move on. That's something that a lot of people struggle with, so I appreciate the importance of this track.

Overall, "What If" is a great track from a beautiful album, one that Last Charge of the Light Horse put a lot of work into to make it a great experience for their listeners. They packed a lot of passion into one song alone, and it's definitely worth the listen. If you enjoy soft rock with thoughtful lyrics, then Last Charge of the Light Horse is the perfect band for you.

 

"simply a gift to our ears and souls" Sound of Now

A song that uses a melancholic tone with a dynamics of classic production, truly showcasing the pure and authentic sound of the Last Charge of the Light Horse. ‘What If’ is the perfect single you would want to hear live, simply a gift to our ears and souls. This one is for the playlists.